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The tale of the Inner Harbour Bridge is a lot longer than the bridge itself. And it is not the most favorable tale from Danish building industry. After about 3½ years of delay it was completed in 2016. But then it was a great success straight away counting as many as 15.000 bicyclists a day!

This is a success that I’m not in any way disputing. I’m an excited user of the connection to the less busy side of the harbour. Another quality is the new, great view, that thousands of Copenhageners is now enjoying every day. Throughout a season hundreds of thousands of tourist does the same. On the move and in small spaces, ‘pockets’, in both sides, where you can stop and take your time to enjoy the famous beauty of Copenhagen.

Bulky

BUT: from an architectural and aesthetical perspective I’m less than impressed. Even less in the light of the fine tradition for slim elegance in bridges in Denmark. Both in a small scale such as this, and in greater scale in numerous bridge construction between the Danish islands.

UPDATE: I stumpled upon some confirmation on this view in a short notice on danish.tm.

From all other places the view has impaired because of the voluminous and – honestly – quite bulky construction. An obvious attempt was made to ‘design’ the bridge with sloping lines and curvy forms. It seems overstrained and actually only emphasizes the bulkyness. Furthermore the long perspectives through the inner harbour is obstructed from most piers in the area.

Because of the uncommon way it opens – two pieces sliding back and meeting in the middle – the bridge earned its nickname, the ‘ Kissing Bridge’
The bridge is designed by London based Cesary Bednarskys firm, Studio Bednarski Ltd.

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